20th Annual Park Ridge Garden Walk

Summer has officially arrived and the flowers are gorgeous! This past weekend was the 20th Annual Park Ridge Garden Walk and Laura’s home garden was one of the six private gardens selected by the Park Ridge Garden Club to showcase delightful flowers and inspiring landscape design. This was a great opportunity for members of the community to come together and enjoy the beautiful weekend and welcome the long awaited dog days of summer. Click here to visit the Chicago Tribune post showcasing the Park Ridge Garden Walk.

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Here is Laura’s personal story of her family’s home and garden. Enjoy the sunshine!

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What You Need To Know About Expunging and Sealing Your Criminal Record: Part 3

Now that we have discussed the basics of expunging and sealing your criminal record, it’s time to answer some Frequently Asked Questions!

1. Q: Do you need to hire a lawyer to assist in filing a petition to expunge or seal your criminal record?

A: Due to the complex process, we recommend hiring a lawyer to assist in filing a petition to expunge or seal your criminal record. However, there are resources available for individuals who cannot afford an attorney or wish to petition to expunge or seal their own record. See the Criminal and Traffic Expungement and Sealing Procedural Guide and note page 2 which provides a list of dates, times, and locations for criminal record expungement and sealing assistance at various courthouses.

2. Q: Why should I file a petition to expunge or seal my criminal record?

A: There are many reasons why it is beneficial for individuals to expunge or seal their criminal record when possible. First, expunging or sealing your criminal record may help you get a job and will also protect the privileges and rights you are entitled to under the law. See the following two questions for examples of what an employer may and may not do under the law. Second, expunging or sealing your criminal record either (1) limits the public’s view of the record in all cases (expungement) or (2) only allows certain law enforcement organizations and individuals to see your record unless a court order was issued by a judge (seal). Third, if you don’t expunge or seal your criminal record, your arrest will appear on your record forever!

3. Q: Are employers allowed to ask you if you have had records expunged or sealed?

A: No. And you are not required to disclose this information on employment applications. See 20 ILCS 2630/12.

4. Q: Can an employer use the fact that you had a criminal record expunged or sealed as a reason to hire, fire, or affect the terms, conditions or privileges of your employment?

A: No. It is a civil rights violation under 20 ILCS 2630/12 for an employer to use the fact you have had a criminal record expunged or sealed as a reason to hire, fire, or affect your terms of employment.

5. Q: What is a RAP sheet and do you need one to file a petition to expunge or seal?

A: A rap sheet, formally known as a Criminal History Record Information, provides a list of your arrests and convictions in the State of Illinois. If you are filing your petition in Chicago a copy of your rap sheet is mandatory. If you are filing in one of the five suburban districts, a rap sheet is not required but is recommended.

6. Q: What is considered a conviction?

A: A conviction is a final judgment of guilt by the court. A conviction includes probation (with certain exceptions), conditional discharge, fine, time considered served, jail time, and a finding of guilty by a judge or jury.

7. Q: What is not considered a conviction?

A: Supervision, nolle prosequi, stricken off with leave to reinstate (SOL), finding of no probable cause (FNPC), non-suit, dismissed, finding of not guilty (FNG), or successful completion of first-offender drug probation.

8. Q: Your case may be eligible for expungement but the time period has not passed yet, can you seal my record in the meantime?

A: Yes. You can seal your record and then when the time period passes you may petition to expunge your record.

9. Q: Are there other forms of relief if your petition to expunge or seal your criminal record is denied?

A: Yes. Other options include*:

Petitions for Executive Clemency: If your petition has been denied, you can file a petition for executive clemency with the governor. A pardon allows a person to expunge a conviction that is otherwise ineligible.
Health Care Waivers: Removes statutory barriers to working in health care facilities;
Certificates of Good Conduct: A finding by the court that the offender has been rehabilitated. A Certificate of Good Conduct can be used to navigate around certain employment and licensing bars;
Certificates of Eligibility for Sealing: A recommendation from the Illinois Prisoner Review Board to order the sealing of an offense that is otherwise ineligible to be sealed.
Obtaining a PERC Card (Permanent Employee Registration Card): PERC cards allow individuals to apply for and achieve eligibility for security positions.

10. Q: What if you were charged as a juvenile?

A: See Section 5-915 of the Juvenile Court Act (705 ILCS 405/5-915). Also see the Guide to Expunge or Seal Your Illinois Juvenile Record prepared by the Office of the State Appellate Defender.

* This list is not exhaustive.

Here is a link to the Clerk of Cook County’s Do-It-Yourself Guide. The guide was also referenced in this post. While the Clerk’s guide offers an excellent step-by-step guide and includes the relevant forms, the process can still be intimidating and confusing. If you have any questions regarding expunging or sealing your criminal record as an adult or a juvenile, from reading your RAP sheet to filing a petition for executive clemency, give us a call at the Law Offices of Laura Morask for a free consultation.

What You Need To Know About Expunging and Sealing Your Criminal Record: Part 2

If you have a criminal conviction on your record, your record may not be eligible for expungement, but you may be eligible to seal your criminal record.  The difference between expunging and sealing your criminal record was discussed in Part 1 of this series, and we cautioned that filing a petition to expunge your criminal record can be a complicated process.  The rules and guidelines for sealing your criminal record can be even more complex and cumbersome.

An important difference between expunging and sealing your criminal record is who or what agency can access the information.  A sealed criminal record can be accessed by a court order or, under 20 ILCS 2630/12 and 13a sealed criminal record can also be accessed by law enforcement, including police officers, prosecutors, and the courts.

Not all criminal records are eligible for sealing.  Generally, the only criminal records that can be sealed are minor, non-violent, non-sexual misdemeanors, and certain felony convictions.

Examples of Non-Violent, Non-Sexual Misdemeanors That Can Be Sealed*: theft, trespass, disorderly conduct, possession of cannabis, prostitution, resisting arrest, retail theft, possession of a weapon, and gambling.

Misdemeanors Which CANNOT Be Sealed*:
• Offenses Under Section 2 of the Crime Victims Compensation Act Including*: Battery, Assault, Domestic Battery, Violations of Order of Protection, Reckless Conduct;
• Sex Offenses Under Article 11 of the Criminal Code (except prostitution);
• Sexual offenses committed against a minor;
Driving under the influence of alcohol or other drugs or intoxicating compounds;
Reckless driving;
• Violations of the Humane Care for Animals Act Including: Dog Fighting and Animal Cruelty.

WAITING PERIODS: Just as there are waiting periods for expungement—2 years for court supervision and 5 years for qualified probation—there are complex and strict waiting periods for individuals seeking to seal their criminal records.

• You can immediately petition to seal a case that resulted in one of the following dispositions: you were released without being charged, you were acquitted, or your case was dismissed. (Exception: SOL/non-suit waiting period is 120-160 days). Acquittals and dismissals can be sealed at any time.

• If you have never been convicted of a criminal offense, you must wait 3 years from the termination of the last sentence on your record before you can petition to seal any case on your record.

• If you were convicted or sentenced to court supervision, you must wait 4 years from the termination of the last sentence on your record. This 4 year waiting period applies to any findings of guilt no matter how long ago it occurred.

• If you received a conviction for a qualifying misdemeanor, you must wait 4 years from the termination of the last sentence on your record.

• If you received probation, including Cannabis Control Act probation, Illinois Controlled Substances Act probation, Methamphetamine Control and Community Protection Act probation, Alcoholism and Other Drug Use Dependency Act probation, and/or Steroid Control Act probation, your case qualifies for sealing 4 years from the termination of the last sentence on your record.

• If you were convicted of a Class 4 felony including prostitution, possession of cannabis, possession of a controlled substance, theft, retail theft, deceptive practices, forgery, or possession of burglary tools*, your case qualifies for sealing 4 years from the termination of the last sentence on your record.

• If you were convicted of a Class 3 felony including theft, retail theft, deceptive practices, forgery, or possession with intent to manufacture or deliver a controlled substance, your case qualifies for sealing 4 years from the termination of the last sentence on your record.

Sealing a criminal record is on a case by case basis, whereas expunging your record is “all or nothing.”  Next time we will discuss frequently asked questions and alternative remedies when expunging or sealing your record is not an option.

* This list is not exhaustive.

See the Illinois General Assembly website for the statute, 20 ILCS 2630/5.2 Expungement and Sealing, and visit the Clerk of Cook County’s website for a very helpful do-it-yourself style procedural guide.

We here at the Law Offices of Laura Morask stand ready to help you with your expunging or sealing needs.  If you have any questions, please give us a call!

What You Need To Know About Expunging and Sealing Your Criminal Record: Part 1

Image courtesy of Naypong and everystockphoto.com.

Image courtesy of Naypong/everystockphoto.com.

If you have been arrested, charged, or convicted of a crime you have a criminal record! Expunging or sealing your criminal record is a legal remedy; your petition to expunge or seal must be filed in court. There is no automatic expungement or sealing of criminal records.

What’s the difference between expungement and sealing? Expungement means the arresting agency and/or Illinois State Police physically destroys your criminal record or returns your record to you. Sealing a record makes it unavailable without a court order, but the record is physically and electronically maintained. As long as you have no criminal conviction on your record, your record may be eligible for expungement. If you have just one criminal conviction, your record is not eligible for expungement, but it might be eligible for sealing (stay tuned for Part 2 of this series).

When considering whether to file a petition to expunge or seal your criminal record, first check the disposition of your case. This means you must determine whether you were given probation or conditional discharge, required to pay a fine, whether the judge considered time served (days you spent in jail) or sentenced you to jail (or the Illinois Department of Corrections), whether a judge or jury found you guilty, or whether you were given a disposition of not guilty.

IMPORTANT! If you were given court supervision or qualified probation, it was successfully completed, and you have no other criminal convictions, your record may be expungeable. If you did not successfully complete your court supervision or qualifying probation, you have a conviction unless the unsatisfactory termination is reversed, vacated, or modified.

You can petition for expungement of your criminal record immediately if you were never convicted of a crime, you were released without being charged, you were acquitted, and/or your case was dismissed. (Two Exceptions for SOL or non-suit)

If you were given court supervision, you must wait 2 years from the successful completion of the supervision before you can file to expunge your record.

If you were given qualified probation, you must wait 5 years from the successful completion of the probation before you can file to expunge your record.

BEWARE: Sentences of supervision for the following offenses cannot be expunged: Driving Under the Influence, Reckless Driving, Sex Offenses Against Minors.

Takeaway Tips:

1. If you have ever been arrested you have a criminal record!
2. If you have even one criminal conviction, you cannot expunge your record.
3. If your record is not eligible for expungement, it may be eligible for sealing.
4. Expunging or sealing your record not automatic!

Expunging or sealing a criminal record can be a complicated process, so be sure to contact an attorney who understands the requirements and nuances involved in the procedure. The Law Offices of Laura J. Morask seeks to educate the community on the basics of criminal law, so please feel free to call our offices to discuss the possibility of expunging or sealing your criminal record.

See the Illinois General Assembly website for the statute, 20 ILCS 2630/5.2 Expungement and Sealing, and visit the Clerk of Cook County’s website for a helpful procedural guide.

Summertime Fun with DUI Checkpoints: The Top 5 Things To Do If You Encounter a DUI Checkpoint

Summertime has finally arrived!  After a long, hard, and cold winter, children are outside riding bikes and playing games.  Families and friends are enjoying sunshine in the park.  With warmer weather comes more fun, and holidays like Memorial Day and the Fourth of July are perfect occasions to relax, take a break from your work, and reflect on our nation’s freedoms and hard-fought independence.

Along with summertime fun, come police safety roadblock checkpoints cracking down on seatbelt or equipment violations, but which are also used to deter drunken driving. These checkpoints are used to ensure motorists are wearing their seatbelts, children are properly secured in car seats, and the motorist has proper license and registration.

In 1985, the Illinois Supreme Court found checkpoints are legal even when there is no probable cause or reasonable suspicion an individual is committing or is about to commit a crime.  To determine whether the checkpoints were constitutional under the Fourth Amendment’s prohibition against reasonable search and seizure, the court balanced the “degree of intrusion on the individual’s privacy” with the public’s interest in allowing the police to establish DUI checkpoints.

Here are the top five things you should do if you encounter a DUI checkpoint:

1. It’s better to be safe than sorry! Don’t drive with any amount of alcohol in your system.

2. Take another route! If you know of the checkpoint before hand, plan your travels accordingly and avoid the checkpoint location.

3. Know your rights! Do not consent to a search of your car or trunk. But…

4. Be polite and courteous! You do not have to answer questions beyond providing the police officer with your license and registration.

5. If you have been arrested or charged with DUI, call a lawyer immediately! We here at the Law Offices of Laura J. Morask practice in the DUI field and can offer you a free consultation.

One Final Note: The last weekend in June, the Illinois State Police will set up checkpoints at the following locations:

Saturday – Sunday, June 28-29 from 11 p.m. to 4 a.m. on the Dan Ryan Expressway, southbound exit to 87th street.

Sunday – Monday, June 29-30 from 11 p.m. to 4 a.m. on I-57 southbound exit to 119th street.

Image courtesy of www.EveryStockPhoto.com

Concealed Carry: Rights and Remedies

Last July, Illinois joined the other 49 states and enacted a concealed carry law. Unsurprisingly, the passage of the law has not been without its glitches and kinks as implementation of the law evolves. The legislature enacted the law to permit law-abiding citizens to carry concealed firearms, so long as they pass a background check and successfully complete the requisite trainings.

The nearly year old concealed carry law has stringent limitations. For example, while the law permits residents and non-residents to apply for a license to carry a concealed handgun, under 430 ILCS 66/65(a-10), the owner of a private or real property of any type may prohibit the carrying of concealed firearms on the property under his or her control. The property owner must post a sign indicating firearms are prohibited on the property, unless the property is a private residence. Not only are those who carry a concealed weapon prohibited from entering places of business which have chosen to prohibit such patrons, individuals with concealed carry licenses are prohibited from carrying those weapons in the following locations:

• Schools, both public and private
• Government buildings (including courthouses)
• Hospitals, nursing homes, and mental facilities
• Playgrounds and public parks
• Stadium Arenas
• Public Libraries
• Airports
• Amusement parks, museums, and zoos

This is an example of the sign private property owners must display if they choose to prohibit individuals from carrying concealed weapons on their premises.

This is an example of the sign private property owners must display if they choose to prohibit individuals from carrying concealed weapons on their premises.

If an individual with a concealed carry permit brings a concealed weapon into the place of business, which prohibits such activity, the offender will be charged with a Class B misdemeanor. A second or subsequent conviction is a Class A misdemeanor. As more applicants file for and receive concealed carry licenses, it is more important now than ever for property owners to understand their rights under the law.

If you have been charged with a violation under the concealed carry act we can represent you in your criminal case or, if you have been denied an application for a concealed carry license, we can help you. The laws and procedures around the appellate process are still developing but there are stringent procedural deadlines for the denied person to follow. Thus, it is helpful to enlist the services of an attorney familiar with the administrative hearing process. At the Law Offices of Laura Morask, one of our practice areas is administrative hearings so feel free to call us for a free consultation. In the event you have been denied a permit and are seeking to appeal that denial, see 430 ILCS 66/87.

Visit the Illinois General Assembly website to read the Concealed Carry Act in its entirety.

A whole New Group of Graduates -Some Words of Advice!

office pic 2office pic 5Lately our law firm has been posting a lot of pictures of our staff and in particular of recent graduates, whether high school, college, graduate school etc. You may wonder why in a criminal defense page I am writing about that but as clich…éd as it may sound these kids are our future and each of the ones I post about I feel I have had some kind of helpful hand in mentoring, teaching, or being a friend in a position to advise about the struggles and angst they feel as they enter college, graduate school or the job market. Having been through all that and somehow come out the other side intact with some well earned scars to the psyche and wrinkles to the face, I think mentoring or advising or giving a kid a chance is one of the greatest things we lawyers can do. Throughout my career I have had great, good and not so good interns and the first two categories are like sponges who  want to learn and do not start at a company thinking they know everything or that they know more than the attorney, partner, Judge etc. Believe me, I have had a few of those. So my message to all you graduates is yes, you can find your passion and I guarantee with the right attitude, it will find you! Don’t be afraid to take risks, aim high, work hard and above all do not compare yourself to others! Also do not forget to have fun along the way! Just because you are now an adult with responsibilities does not mean you should not have fun doing what you do. This morning I was honored to be at a graduation party for my neighbor Ariana Grieco who just got accepted into Northwestern University Graduate Program. When she got accepted I was overjoyed and called her and was surprised to hear how stressed she was at the prospect of not being able to keep up in the program-an idea she had totally put in her own mind that had no basis in reality. I reminded her of her promise she made to me after she had completed all her grad school applications, that she would take some time to have a little fun. I told her what I am telling you now; face the future not with fear but with anticipation and realize that you can do it. Not to go all sixties on you but if you face the future with anticipation and not fear, you are writing the script for yourself! So write the good one, not the negative one. But above all, write something:
make a choice, a decision, take a risk, learn something new. Inaction gets you nowhere but stuck. And have a blast along the way. I know I did.

The Criminal Conviction and Its Collateral Consequences

All too often, when a client walks into my office, he or she is unaware of the collateral consequences that may result from DUI or controlled substance conviction. Most clients are unaware of what a collateral consequence is, let alone the plethora of non-legal repercussions, which almost always attach to criminal convictions.

What is a collateral consequence?

Collateral consequences are the indirect results of a criminal conviction. Direct consequences include the prison sentence, fees and costs. Examples of indirect consequences include ineligibility for federal welfare benefits, an increased risk of deportation, voting restrictions, loss of custodial rights, and difficulty finding employments after conviction.

The Constitution does require a criminal defense attorney to impart the direct consequences of a guilty plea to his client, it does not require criminal defense lawyers to disclose potential collateral consequences. It is important for lawyers and clients alike to understand both the direct and indirect consequences of “pleading guilty.” Below you will find a list of potential collateral consequences for motor vehicle and controlled substances convictions. Please note that this list is not exhaustive and a motor vehicle or controlled substance offense may or may not include any or all of the listed consequences.

Collateral Consequences for Motor Vehicle Offenses

1. Suspension or Revocation of Driver’s License: This consequence may seem like a no-brainer, of course you risk losing your license for driving under the influence! However, remember that this penalty is in addition to any prison time and fees and costs incurred resulting from a criminal conviction.

2. Ineligibility for reduction in automobile insurance rates and premiums.

3. Employment Restrictions: A conviction for a motor vehicle offense renders the offender ineligible to obtain nearly any professional bus driver position.

4. If you are an out of state resident, the Secretary of State is authorized to notify your home state of a driving conviction that occurred in Illinois.

Collateral Consequences for Controlled Substances Convictions

1. Ineligibility for Cash Public Assistance: Individuals who are convicted of a Class X or Class 1 felony are subject to mandatory, automatic, and permanent ineligibility for cash public assistance.

2. Employment Restrictions: Individuals who are convicted of controlled substances offenses are ineligible for employment with:
• Illinois State Police
• Park Districts
• Public School Districts
• Recognized non-public schools
• In-state charter school bus service provider
• Nursing homes, as a nursing assistant or aide
• Certain mental health care facilities

3. Ineligibility to serve as a foster or adoptive parent.

4. Ineligibility to receive certain governmental medical assistance

5. Revoked or suspended driver’s license.

6. Forfeiture of property related to the crime.

7. Deny sale or rental of home due to conviction.

Potential collateral consequences can touch on nearly every aspect of a client’s life, from his family, to his home, and his place of employment. When faced with the potential for a criminal conviction, take a moment to ensure all parties are aware of the specific collateral consequences the client might face. Doing so will help the client feel as though the criminal conviction, that may permeate through different aspects of his life, has been thoroughly evaluated and analyzed, both directly and indirectly.

Top Ten Things Not to Do When You Call My Law Office to Sell Me Something!

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As an almost three year old firm whose phone now rings with actual potential clients I was thinking back to the early weeks of going out on my own and lurching for the phone anytime it rang, only to be greeted by a company cold calling to solicit my law firm to sell me “much needed” (fill in the blank-SEO marketing, office equipment, Business class internet, phones, temps, leads, law books, 10,000$ coaching seminars, website development…) You get the picture. At first, despite my secretary’s valiant efforts to screen those calls by yelling out; “don’t pick up-it’s a 1-800 number”, or trying to dive for the extension first, I always picked up and gave the caller a chance. Call me crazy, gullible, shopaholic, lonely, thrilled to get a phone call, polite, or maybe just empathetic-part of me wants to give the seller a shot as long ago I too had a sales job cold calling in New York City and know how terrible constant rejection can be. But after surviving a dizzying array of calls selling ridiculously expensive “indispensable” products that I never knew even existed, I started to feel harassed as if I was the only new business out there. So to save new solo lawyers or entrepreneurs a valuable learning curve and maybe try to have cold calling companies try to grasp why 99% of people hang up…here are my top ten personal pet peeves.

  1. Do not ever and I mean EVER call me with a computer voice asking me to “punch 1” to reach their agent. This should be self-explanatory. You might get punched through the phone line!
  2. Don’t pretend your name is Google if it’s not. Google does not typically call you. This one kills me, I’ve had fights with agents who “explain” that “No, we are not really Google when I ask why they are using the Google name and they babble some nonsense about how they are licensed to sell Google products and are the only people who guarantee to put me on the front page of rankings. After explaining the concept of fraud or bait and switch, I hang up!
  3.  Do not call and tell me that you are not selling anything! This one drives me nuts. I feel compelled to toy with these people because of course they are indeed selling you something-be honest!  See # 4.
  4. Know what it is you are selling and how much it costs. In other words, don’t waste my time. A perfect example is the call I got yesterday from a girl who claimed to have left numerous messages as someone named, let’s say, “Mary”, no company name, no hint of who she was. I then asked her if she was selling something to which she said no. I asked her why she was calling. She wanted to set up a meeting to discuss her product at my office, (that she wasn’t selling!) Now, I launched into full on criminal defense lawyer mode  and asked her why would I set up a meeting to listen about a product that she wasn’t selling from a company that she had not yet told me the name! Finally, after ten minutes (I know, lots of you would say I should have hung up by now, but I had already started writing this article and this girl was proving my point-I couldn’t resist…) she told me she was from Aflac and after much probing told me she was selling supplemental benefit plans for employers to give their employees.  So since I am not a cold hearted employer and I like their commercials I asked her for an overview and cost of benefit plans. Here is where she started stuttering, trying to look up what they sold and the cost. This girl literally had no idea of the cost of anything! It became clear that I had violated her script of calling to get an in person meeting. She had no ability to adapt her script to a customer who may actually want to explore what she sold but had no time for an in person meeting. She lost a potential customer.

5.  Do not oversell or lie. How many times have you received the call from a company telling you that only their product, service, company can save me from financial ruin, put me on the front page of Google, and find me fifty clients a day all for one low price of 29.99 which later turns out to be an introductory offer for a week followed by an ironclad contract that costs an arm and a leg and self-renews without a 30 day cancellation.. Oh and let’s not forget the three free magazines you don’t want that are impossible to cancel!

6. Do not make an end run around my secretary. I am  lucky enough to have had two  wonderful and  very fiscally conservative  secretaries in my two + years of private practice  who literally screened out all sales calls that we did not need. My secretary would say a polite but firm; “No, we are not interested”. Then they would ask her if she was the attorney and she would say; “No, but that this is based on my attorney’s authority.” Invariably, the person would call back numerous times hoping for me to pick up which occasionally I did. Just to give them hell-if you don’t respect my secretary, I don’t want to do business with you!

7. Do not ever call to ask if I am the person in charge of the electric bill! Enough said. Particularly if you are in Park Ridge where the power goes out on a regular basis….

8.  Please learn to take “No” for an answer, particularly if you cold call me at the office.   See # #9.

9. Please take it on faith that I know how my business operates and whether what you sell fits into my needs. Persistence can be a great virtue s your job and yes I have been in your shoes but remember you are interrupting someone in the middle of the day and again if my secretary out front says we are not interested, we usually are not. She actually does give me messages! See # 10.

10. Research the company you are trying to sell to! If I am a brand new solo practitioner in a Criminal Defense Law Firm, chances are really good that I will not be interested in a $20,000 computer network. Chances are also really high that I have obtained my computers/phone system/electric before I made the investment to open for business. Another true story-I had two very nice girls from one of the second tier phone providers walk in two years after I had been in business to sell me on their business phone plan claiming they  could reduce my bill by half and provide me instantly with four new phones exactly the same as my old ones or better. Because it was my 4:00 PM lull, I listened to the pitch. Unfortunately for them, I have become an educated phone consumer and had just read up on this “too good to be true” offer.  Upon further questioning (since they were really nice, I only went into half criminal defense lawyer cross exam mode) it was clear they had no idea how or if an IPad fit into this plan. I am addicted to my IPad and waited while they called their boss. I watched as this sales supervisor herself was put on hold by her own company for over 20 minutes! Being a soft touch, I still let them run a soft credit check to even see if my “acceptance” into the plan with no money down was even possible.   I cleared that hurdle and delved further into the incredible sounding offer of sending me four new upgraded Iphones overnight. Finally, I found out that the replacement phones would be android based, not IPhones and that the customer had to go into the store, fill out a rebate form, transfer their number, and stand on their head to obtain a completely different phone for which I would have to send in rebate forms etc.!!! Still no info on the IPad. The total savings? Fifty Dollars! See # 6 above.

This is just my list and you may laugh at my idiocy or disagree with my top ten. But if this saves any of you budding entrepreneurs or start up law firms out there future pain on the learning curve it’s okay! Feel free to share yours!

Laura chaired the annual Maine township Republican Women’s Fashion Show and luncheon

534eda23224ca.preview-300We at the Law Offices of Laura J Morask promote community involvement in our local area. This past Saturday, April 12, Laura chaired the annual Maine township Republican Women’s Fashion Show and luncheon.

Held at the Chateau Ritz in Niles, this year’s show yielded about 85 attendees. Clothing was provided by Taylor Marie’s, a mobile fashion store. Taylor Marie’s set up a temporary store at the Chateau Ritz and donated 10% of sales to the Maine Township Republican Women’s group to support their efforts within the township.
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It was expected that the fundraiser would meet or exceed last year’s event which yielded about $2,000. Additionally, a 50/50 raffle raised $200 for the Maine Township Food Pantry.